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Executive Insights

Read valuable and timely articles from our executive team of experts to further your precious metals and coin knowledge.

Our Executive Authors

AngelaRoberts

Angela Roberts

CEO

Chief Executive Officer Angela Roberts joined U.S. Money Reserve in 2003. Roberts has held numerous positions within the organization, culminating in her promotion to CEO in 2015. She is credited with creating the analytic and KPI structure at U.S. Money Reserve. Believing strongly that the people make the business, Roberts has positioned U.S. Money Reserve to be a trusted precious metal leader that always puts their customers and employees first. Learn more in her interview with Forbes.

John-Rothans

John Rothans

Master Numismatist

Chief Procurement Officer and Master Numismatist John Rothans has been a key fixture in the numismatic industry for over 30 years. Rothans joined U.S. Money Reserve as a consultant in 2004, eventually becoming Chief Procurement Officer and overseeing all wholesale operations, new product lines, and coin strategy. Rothans is credited with the development, production, and distribution of proprietary product offerings, including U.S. Money Reserve’s best-selling Pearl Harbor and Iwo Jima coin series.

Philip-Diehl

Philip Diehl

President

Philip N. Diehl is the president of U.S. Money Reserve and a published analyst of the precious metals markets. As 35th Director of the U.S. Mint (1994–2000), Diehl oversaw one of the most impressive government agency turnarounds in recent U.S. history through new product initiatives, increased oversight, strategic reorganization, and fiscal responsibility. His experience and expert knowledge in the field of precious metals strengthens U.S. Money Reserve’s commitment to a superior customer experience.

Edmund c moy u.s. mint direct headshot

Edmund C. Moy

Senior IRA Strategist

Edmund C. Moy collaborates with U.S. Money Reserve as Senior IRA Strategist. A recipient of the Alexander Hamilton Medal for public service, awarded to him by then-Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson, Jr., Moy served as the 38th Director of the United States Mint (2006–2011). Among many accomplishments during his tenure, Moy oversaw one of the largest increases in volume of precious metals output in Mint history, as Americans turned to safe-haven assets in the wake of the Great Recession.

Recent Articles

Shadow Banking: A Dodd-Frank Fail?

Shadow Banking: A Dodd-Frank Fail?

In response to the financial crisis of 2008–2009 regulators came down hard on big banks. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act outlined numerous provisions designed to tightly monitor lending and reduce risks inherent in the U.S. financial system, including new oversight councils, credit agency reforms, and...

Irrational Exuberance: The Lesson of the Bird in the Bush

Irrational Exuberance: The Lesson of the Bird in the Bush

Irrational Exuberance: The Lesson of the Bird in the Bush “How do we know when irrational exuberance has unduly escalated asset values, which then become subject to unexpected and prolonged contractions?” Alan Greenspan, December 5, 1996 Another day, another market record. The Dow has set some 36 record high closings since the 2016...

The Great Retirement Caper: The 401(k) Bait and Switch

The Great Retirement Caper: The 401(k) Bait and Switch

The markets are at an all-time high, and you can already smell the suntan oil of that Caribbean island getaway, the first stop of your retirement tour! Then you start doing the math. You add up life’s daily costs against your life expectancy. You tally food, housing, healthcare, transportation and travel costs, and the nest egg suddenly...

Will Cryptocurrencies Ever Replace Gold?

Will Cryptocurrencies Ever Replace Gold?

Gold has been shining bright for thousands of years, including the year 2017. Gold prices gained 9 percent in the first quarter and 10 percent so far this year, reports Nasdaq. Despite such success, gold has taken a backseat to cryptocurrencies in some circles, leaving precious metals owners and market analysts alike wondering, "Could...

Baseball, Hot Dogs and Credit Cards

Baseball, Hot Dogs and Credit Cards

After a short stint of penny-pinching prudence, Americans are back to swiping their way to big charge card balances. Credit cards, after all, are as American as football and apple pie—and we are racking up debt like it’s 1999. Unlike the 1990s, however, GDP has not cracked 4% since the year 2000, and we’ve only averaged about 1.8%...

Trump Bump Deflates Under Political Pressure

Trump Bump Deflates Under Political Pressure

Markets inhaled a giant gulp of fresh air when Donald Trump was elected in November 2017, a gulp that buoyed them to new heights. Equities rallied and bond yields climbed to match forecasters’ hopes for tax cuts, health care reform, infrastructure spending, and deregulation. The S&P 500 rose about 5 percent in President Trump's...

The Lessons of 1994

The Lessons of 1994

Back in 1994, a gallon of gas was about $1.09. A movie ticket was about $4 and the average cost of a new home in the United States was just under $120,000. But, presiding economic conditions, along with a few uncanny political events, and one major fiscal calamity offer some very important parallels about today’s economy and the risk to...

The Entire World Just Got Hacked! So, How Safe is our Money?

The Entire World Just Got Hacked! So, How Safe is our Money?

Every generation worries about money. Our parents’ and grandparents’ life savings were under constant threat due to war, depression, recession, market crashes and the actions of government. We face many of these risks today along with something else—cyberwarfare. While virtually unseen and untraceable, this monetary threat is highly...

There is nothing to fear but the “fear index” itself

There is nothing to fear but the “fear index” itself

With North Korea playing chicken with missile tests, the Cold War on permafrost, and Tehran free of sanctions and flush with cash—one would expect a world of worry on Wall Street. Add insurmountable sovereign debt, stagnant GDP, a shrinking middle class, a massive federal balance sheet and exasperating hyper-partisanship—and portfolio...

The $20 Trillion Divide: Why This Debt is Different

The $20 Trillion Divide: Why This Debt is Different

As of this writing, our National Debt sits just under $19.9 trillion dollars. The ever-ticking Debt Clock is the 800-pound gorilla lurking in the main boardroom of the U.S Department of the Treasury. The $20 trillion mark is the 900-pound grizzly at the end of the hallway. It is an implausible amount of money that includes both public...

Why Do Central Banks Buy Gold?

Why Do Central Banks Buy Gold?

Central banks around the world have been quietly buying gold for nearly a decade, reports the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF), and have been net buyers every year since 2008. Their demand for gold jumped from less than two percent of total world demand in 2010, to 14 percent in 2014, adds the World Gold...

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