Too Low for Too Long: The Curious Case of the Federal Funds Rate

Low interest rates are a good thing, right? Anyone with a car loan or mortgage payment understands the benefits of living in a low–interest rate environment—particularly if you’re old enough to remember the double-digit days of the 1980s when the Federal Reserve ramped up rates in an effort to stave off inflation. In October 1981,…

Too Low for Too Long: The Curious Case of the Federal Funds RateDetails

Why Bad Things Happen on Mondays: A Short History of Market Crashes

Americans have a long tradition of dreading Mondays. Many of us are jolted back to reality at the start of each week by an alarm clock that signals the end of leisure, relaxation, and time with family and friends. It also marks the beginning of five days of work packed with new projects, deadlines, and expectations.   On Mondays, responsibility and accountability return, and we feel miles from Friday—the coveted moment at the end of each week when we…

Why Bad Things Happen on Mondays: A Short History of Market CrashesDetails

A Low Chance of Risk and a High Chance of Ruin

The Cambridge Dictionary defines volatility as “the quality or state of being likely to change suddenly, especially by becoming worse.” This definition can be applied in many areas. In chemistry, volatility is the tendency for a substance to vaporize. In computer science, it’s the risk of catastrophic memory loss. In meteorology, it’s the probability of…

A Low Chance of Risk and a High Chance of RuinDetails

Are You Making Any of Today’s Worst Financial Mistakes?

Unused gym memberships, lottery tickets, and cheaply made clothes are just three of the top money wasters among American consumers. But when it comes to retirement, those money mistakes are greatly outweighed by some much bigger financial blunders. A new special report from U.S. Money Reserve outlines five things you should avoid doing with your…

Are You Making Any of Today’s Worst Financial Mistakes?Details

Fed Patience Is not a Virtue—It’s a Dire Warning

After a decade of Quantitative Easing (QE) and massive asset purchases designed to rouse the economy out of crisis, America’s central bank began Quantitative Tightening (QT) in 2014. QT is essentially the reversal of QE: the process of not only ending federal bond buying but also unwinding the national balance sheet, which expanded dramatically after…

Fed Patience Is not a Virtue—It’s a Dire WarningDetails

Mixed Signals from the Tightrope: The Fed in 2019

Will they or won’t they? When it comes to raising the federal funds rate, this is always the $64 million question.   The federal funds rate is the interest rate that banks charge each other. While it is generally considered to be the most important rate in the world of finance, it is also a crucial variable in the life of the average American household, the financial markets, and the broader economy.  The…

Mixed Signals from the Tightrope: The Fed in 2019Details

Cryptocurrency May Not Be a Safe Haven, But Here’s Why Gold Is

In anything but a cryptic fashion, many market observers are signaling the fall of cryptocurrency and promoting the security of precious metals like gold. A recent CNBC.com article declared that the hot streak that had been enjoyed by bitcoin—the most prominent type of cryptocurrency—is “truly dead.” As a result, people are gravitating toward gold as…

Cryptocurrency May Not Be a Safe Haven, But Here's Why Gold IsDetails